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Fuji grew steadily more popular between the 1960s and '70s, becoming closely associated with Islam in the process.Fuji has been described as jùjú without guitars; ironically, Ebenezer Obey once described jùjú as mambo with guitars.Fuji was a synthesis of apala with the "ornamented, free-rhythmic" vocals of ajisari devotional musicians and was accompanied by the sakara, a tambourine-drum, and Hawaiian guitar.Among the genre's earliest stars were Haruna Ishola and Ayinla Omowura; Ishola released numerous hits from the late '50s to the early '80s, becoming one of the country's most famous performers.After a very long time — with hits such as "Orilonise," Fuji Disco/Iku Baba Obey," "Oke Agba," "Aye," and "Suuru" — he later changed the group's name to "Supreme Fuji Commanders" with a bang! Ayinde's rival was Ayinla Kollington, "Baba Alatika," known for fast tempo and dance-able brand of fuji, who also recorded hit albums like "ko bo simi lo'run mo e, in the 80s he released "ijo yoyo, Lakukulala and American megastar" to mention few of his successful albums.

The first stars of fuji were the rival bandleaders Alhaji Sikiru Ayinde Barrister and Ayinla Kollington.

At the same time, apala's Haruna Ishola was becoming one of the country's biggest stars.

In the early to mid 1970s, three of the biggest names in Nigerian music history were at their peak: Fela Kuti, Ebenezer Obey and King Sunny Ade, while the end of that decade saw the start of Yo-pop and Nigerian reggae.

However, a few performers kept the style alive, such as Yoruba singer and trumpeter Victor Olaiya (the only Nigerian to ever earn a platinum record), Stephen Osita Osadebe, Sonny Okosun, Victor Uwaifo, and Orlando "Dr.

Ganja" Owoh, whose distinctive toye style fused jùjú and highlife.

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