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It was here that one of the era’s most heinous acts of terror occurred.Klu Klux Klansmen set off a powerful explosive during a Sunday morning service, killing four little girls, in September of that year.In urban areas, where Black and minority voters live, Moore was decidedly rejected.In Jefferson County, which includes Birmingham, Jones captured more than 68 percent of the vote.Also, embedded in the capital improvement project budget, way down at the bottom, is

It was here that one of the era’s most heinous acts of terror occurred.Klu Klux Klansmen set off a powerful explosive during a Sunday morning service, killing four little girls, in September of that year.In urban areas, where Black and minority voters live, Moore was decidedly rejected.In Jefferson County, which includes Birmingham, Jones captured more than 68 percent of the vote.Also, embedded in the capital improvement project budget, way down at the bottom, is $1 million for planning and assessment of public-private prison partnerships.

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It was here that one of the era’s most heinous acts of terror occurred.

Klu Klux Klansmen set off a powerful explosive during a Sunday morning service, killing four little girls, in September of that year.

In urban areas, where Black and minority voters live, Moore was decidedly rejected.

In Jefferson County, which includes Birmingham, Jones captured more than 68 percent of the vote.

Also, embedded in the capital improvement project budget, way down at the bottom, is $1 million for planning and assessment of public-private prison partnerships.

Because making a profit off of incarcerated individuals has never, ever led to human rights-violating conflicts of interest.

million for planning and assessment of public-private prison partnerships.

In an interview with the SPLC ahead of 50th anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, Dorothy Guilford, then 94, recounted taking a literacy test to become eligible and standing in long lines to pay her poll tax.Merrill said he was updating the voter rolls to reflect address changes.But Black voters in Alabama are right to be suspicious.Workers told Jiles that she could only cast a “provisional” ballot, one that would not be counted unless she drove to another precinct to update her information.Jiles wasn’t the only one at the First Assembly polling place that was told this. “It’s not that we’re not showing up to vote—we’re being suppressed,” said Jiles.

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