Intimidating polish translation

Moreover, I’ve discovered a profound satisfaction in learning to read records about my ancestors in the original language, and having someone else translate the record for me just isn’t as much fun.

So, I realized early on that this was sink or swim.

Instead, they’re usually found lying on the kitchen table or coffee table, next to my laptop, because I refer to them so often for a quick look-up of an unfamiliar word or review of grammatical case endings.

I’ve always been one to do genealogy on shoestring budget.

Starting out in the translation industry can be an intimidating experience. I was eager to start my translation career, however, it wasn’t long before I hit several daunting walls, one of which was literal translation.

” These questions and more were on my mind as I started out on my journey to become a translator.

Since Polish, Russian and Latin records are pretty comfortable for me at this point, I’ve developed a preference for research using documents written in those languages, and I’ve been putting off research that involves German-language records, for both my own family, and for my husband’s ancestors from Prussian Poland. Now that their German guide has made its way into my eager hands, I have no more excuses. So my next post will include my very first German translation, but I admit, I’m on a sharp learning curve right now.As genealogists, we often have to contend with grainy or fuzzy microfilms of original records that may have been faded, smeared, torn, taped, or exhibit bleed-through from the other side of the page.We’ve all seen plenty of examples of the illegible chicken-scratch that passes for handwriting on certain documents pertaining to our ancestors. While I was at the biennial conference of the Polish Genealogical Society of Connecticut and the Northeast last weekend, I had the opportunity to purchase one of the very first copies of by William F. My family is all too familiar with these books, because they’re the ones that never seem to make it back to the bookshelf. I’ve been eagerly awaiting the publication of this book for several years now, because I found Volumes I, II, and III (for Polish, Russian, and Latin translations, respectively) to be absolutely indispensable research aids.

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