Students and online dating

Interestingly, Hinge, which bills itself as “The Relationship App” and markets itself as a way out of “casual dating,” was the least-favored app on our list, with only 1.8% of respondents claiming it as their way of finding digital dates.

In 2013, just 10% of ages 18 to 24 reported using a dating app or site.

Ok Cupid and Match, both of which are mobile adaptations of older desktop online dating programs, were used by 8.6% and 6.4% of respondents, respectively.

Grindr’s more specialized audience — the app is meant primarily for gay and bisexual men — probably explains why only 4.3% of respondents said they used it.

Of Tinder users, 34.4% of said entertainment was their primary motivator, but they weren’t the only ones: Bumble (27.1%) and Grindr (23.3%) users also ranked it as their main reason.

More people of every gender are using the apps to pursue casual dating than to find hookups, which have nearly become synonymous with apps like Tinder.

We asked several questions about the possibly-thorny issue of dating apps cohabiting with a committed relationship.

She said the rise of online dating apps among college students can be attributed to the overall historical changes in college dating.

Interest in online dating has skyrocketed in recent years, especially among younger Millennials.

Although it’s by far the most commonly used dating app, nearly 50% of Tinder’s surveyed users cite curing boredom and getting an ego boost as their main intention.

In fact, Bumble beat out Tinder in users primarily looking for hookups, 9.6% to 9%. In a more heartwarming turn, more people overall are using the apps to find love (11.5%) than to find hookups (8.8%).

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